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Philip Clarke at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery
Beauty by Design: Fashioning the Renaissance. 15 November 2014 -3 May 2015. 1 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2 Admission free.

Philip Clarke exhibits at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Beauty by Design: Fashioning the Renaissance

15 November 2014 -3 May 2015.
1 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2
Admission free.
 

Philip Clarke, programme leader of BA Fashion Communication and Styling is exhibiting work in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh.

The collaborative work was made in response to Paris Bordone’s ‘Venetian Women at their Toilet’ and is featured in the Beauty by Design exhibition, showing from November 15th 2014 to May 3rd 2015. The project was launched in September 2012, with experts from a variety of areas (history of art and costume, fashion design, history, psychology, and education), who were interested in considering how Renaissance art could be used to question contemporary notions of beauty and body image.

Having chosen the painting by Bordone from the collection of the Scottish National Galleries, the group began by considering ideas about altered perceptions of beauty, body image, race, age and social status, which are inferred within each figure in the painting and by the setting that they occupy. Dr. Jill Burke (University of Edinburgh) and Dr. Patricia Allerston (Scottish National Galleries) provided additional information on historical references and the symbolism within the work, allowing the group to considered contemporary ideals of beauty alongside ideals of beauty from the time of the Renaissance.

Subsequent discussions led the group to take different aspects of the original work, to be explored in the studio using models, set design, bespoke clothing, and styling. The three images have been conceived as a triptych – a picture made in three parts and intended to be appreciated together. The triptych format was chosen as a means to present different aspects of the original painting and represent them in separate images that come together to form a single work.

Credits: Triptych (After Paris Bordon’s Venetian Women at their Toilet), 2014. Paul Hodgson (Artist), Sharon Lloyd (Southampton Solent University), Anne Chaisty (Arts University College Bournemouth). In collaboration with Edinburgh College of Art.