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Dana Arnold at Art and Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human
7-8 Dec 2015, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research

Dana Arnold at Art and Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human

Dana Arnold, Professor of Architectural History and Theory, is an invited speaker at the Art and Brain: How Imagery Makes Us Human Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research on 7ht and 8th December 2015.
 

The aim of this conference is to encourage an interdisciplinary discussion between archaeologists, neurophysiologists and artists to develop current understandings and interpretations of non-verbal communication in prehistory.  An important component of being human is how we see, including how the brain organises these perceptions and how this is coordinated with the rest of the body. Great advances in research regarding the cognition of vision have been achieved in recent years; we now know that particular visual stimuli relate to specific parts of the brain. These advances have created a platform for a new understanding of prehistoric visual imagery in Africa and Europe tens of thousands of years ago; since, as anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens) we share the same neurophysiological capacities as our ancestors. Sessions will include the use of colour, line and, embodiment and fragmentation.

Organised by Liliana Janik, Sarah Evans, Simon Kaner, Emma Weisblatt with the support of:

The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research
Sainsbury Institute for Japanese Arts and Cultures